Opening Reception:A Shared Legacy: Folk Art in America

Friday, August 17, 2018 - 5:00pm to 8:00pm

August 17, 5-8:00pm: Opening Reception for A Shared Legacy: FOLK ART IN AMERICA 

This exhibition tells the story of the extraordinary work created by self-taught or minimally trained artists in New England, the Midwest, the Mid-Atlantic, and the South between 1800 and 1925.  Made by artists in rural areas, these works did not always adhere to the academic models that established artistic taste in urban centers of the East Coast.  Yet, because of the large number of professional and amateur artists who created folk art in the years following the Nation's founding — and the sheer quantity of art they produced — folk art was the prevalent art form in the United States for more than a century. 

The exhibition showcases more than 60 works by some of the most admired 19th-century American artists.  Included are rare and very fine portraits by such artists as Ammi Phillips and John Brewster, Jr.; vivid still lifes, allegorical scenes and landscapes, including a mature Peaceable Kingdom by Edward Hicks (ab

Location

North Main Street

The LCVA is a 20,000-square-foot exhibition center featuring two rotating galleries that have shown works of worldwide importance, including the award-winning Reflecting Centuries of Beauty: The Rowe Collection of Chinese Art, the nationally traveled Pre-Columbian Art from the Mississippi Museum of Art, and a steady stream of solo and group exhibitions for nationally known artists such as Faith Ringgold, Jaune Quick-to-See Smith, Lesley Dill, David Macaulay, and Kojo Griffin.

The LCVA also dedicates one gallery to a permanent exhibition of stunning African art, part of the Ziegler and Brumfield Collections of African Art. In 1997 Robert Ziegler, a longtime resident of Africa, established this collection with twenty-six important pieces. In 1999, Thomas and Donna Brumfield donated an additional eighty-eight works of African art. The collection includes an impressive array of statues, masks, drums, baskets, and garments, covering four geographical areas, twelve countries, and twenty-seven cultures. A catalog of this collection, Telling Objects: African Art from the Permanent Collection of the Longwood Center for the Visual Arts, is available.